Next Web: web 3.0, web semántica y el futuro de internet > ai

    sortFiltrar Ordenar
    10 resultados

    Pdf

    /

    Publicado el 1.10.2018 por Equipo GNOSS

    Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030. Stanford University

    "Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030" One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence: Report of the 2015-2016 Study Panel, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,  September 2016. Doc: http://ai100.stanford.edu/2016-report. Accessed:  September 6, 2016.

    Executive Summary. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a science and a set of computational technologies that are inspired by—but typically operate quite differently from—the ways people use their nervous systems and bodies to sense, learn, reason, and take action. While the rate of progress in AI has been patchy and unpredictable, there have been significant advances since the field's inception sixty years ago. Once a mostly academic area of study, twenty-first century AI enables a constellation of mainstream technologies that are having a substantial impact on everyday lives. Computer vision and AI planning, for example, drive the video games that are now a bigger entertainment industry than Hollywood. Deep learning, a form of machine learning based on layered representations of variables referred to as neural networks, has made speech-understanding practical on our phones and in our kitchens, and its algorithms can be applied widely to an array of applications that rely on pattern recognition. Natural Language Processing (NLP) and knowledge representation and reasoning have enabled a machine to beat the Jeopardy champion and are bringing new power to Web searches.

    While impressive, these technologies are highly tailored to particular tasks. Each application typically requires years of specialized research and careful, unique construction. In similarly targeted applications, substantial increases in the future uses of AI technologies, including more self-driving cars, healthcare diagnostics and targeted treatments, and physical assistance for elder care can be expected. AI and robotics will also be applied across the globe in industries struggling to attract younger workers, such as agriculture, food processing, fulfillment centers, and factories. They will facilitate delivery of online purchases through flying drones, self-driving trucks, or robots that can get up the stairs to the front door.

    This report is the first in a series to be issued at regular intervals as a part of the One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100). Starting from a charge given by the AI100 Standing Committee to consider the likely influences of AI in a typical North American city by the year 2030, the 2015 Study Panel, comprising experts in AI and other relevant areas focused their attention on eight domains they considered most salient: transportation; service robots; healthcare; education; low-resource communities; public safety and security; employment and workplace; and entertainment. In each of these domains, the report both reflects on progress in the past fifteen years and anticipates developments in the coming fifteen years. Though drawing from a common source of research, each domain reflects different AI influences and challenges, such as the difficulty of creating safe and reliable hardware (transportation and service robots), the difficulty of smoothly interacting with human experts (healthcare and education), the challenge of gaining public trust (low-resource communities and public safety and security), the challenge of overcoming fears of marginalizing humans (employment and workplace), and the social and societal risk of diminishing interpersonal interactions (entertainment). The report begins with a reflection on what constitutes Artificial Intelligence, and concludes with recommendations concerning AI-related policy. These recommendations include accruing technical expertise about AI in government and devoting more resources—and removing impediments—to research on the fairness, security, privacy, and societal impacts of AI systems.

    Contrary to the more fantastic predictions for AI in the popular press, the Study Panel found no cause for concern that AI is an imminent threat to humankind. No machines with self-sustaining long-term goals and intent have been developed, nor are they likely to be developed in the near future. Instead, increasingly useful applications of AI, with potentially profound positive impacts on our society and economy are likely to emerge between now and 2030, the period this report considers. At the same time, many of these developments will spur disruptions in how human labor is augmented or replaced by AI, creating new challenges for the economy and society more broadly. Application design and policy decisions made in the near term are likely to have long-lasting influences on the nature and directions of such developments, making it important for AI researchers, developers, social scientists, and policymakers to balance the imperative to innovate with mechanisms to ensure that AI's economic and social benefits are broadly shared across society. If society approaches these technologies primarily with fear and suspicion, missteps that slow AI's development or drive it underground will result, impeding important work on ensuring the safety and reliability of AI technologies. On the other hand, if society approaches AI with a more open mind, the technologies emerging from the field could profoundly transform society for the better in the coming decades.

    Study Panel: 

    Peter Stone, Chair, University of Texas at Austin
    Rodney Brooks, Rethink Robotics
    Erik Brynjolfsson, Massachussets Institute of Technology
    Ryan Calo, University of Washington
    Oren Etzioni, Allen Institute for AI
    Greg Hager, Johns Hopkins University
    Julia Hirschberg, Columbia University
    Shivaram Kalyanakrishnan, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
    Ece Kamar, Microsoft Research
    Sarit Kraus, Bar Ilan University
    Kevin Leyton-Brown, University of British Columbia
    David Parkes, Harvard University
    William Press, University of Texas at Austin
    AnnaLee (Anno) Saxenian, University of California, Berkeley
    Julie Shah, Massachussets Institute of Technology
    Milind Tambe, University of Southern California
    Astro Teller, X

     

     

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 7.8.2018 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Why Knowledge Graphs Are Foundational to Artificial Intelligence (by Jim Webber)

    AI is poised to drive the next wave of technological disruption across industries. Like previous technology revolutions in Web and mobile, however, there will be huge dividends for those organizations who can harness this technology for competitive advantage.

    I spend a lot of time working with customers, many of whom are investing significant time and effort  in building AI applications for this very reason. From the outside, these applications couldn’t be more diverse – fraud detection, retail recommendation engines, knowledge sharing – but I see a sweeping opportunity across the board: context.

    Without context (who the user is, what they are searching for, what similar users have searched for in the past, and how all these connections play together) these AI applications may never reach their full potential. Context is data, and as a data geek, that is profoundly exciting.

    We’re now looking at things, not strings

    ...

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 1.8.2018 por Equipo GNOSS

    La construcción del Grafo de Conocimiento en Linkedin

    El director de Inteligencia Artificial de Linkedin explica en este artículo como Linkedin está construyendo su Grafo de Conocimiento.

    LinkedIn knowledge Graph es una gran base de conocimiento construida sobre "entidades" en LinkedIn, como miembros, trabajos, títulos, habilidades, compañías, ubicaciones geográficas, escuelas, etc. Estas entidades y las relaciones entre ellas forman la ontología del mundo profesional y son utilizados por LinkedIn para mejorar sus sistemas de recomendación, búsqueda, monetización y productos de consumo, negocios y análisis del consumidor.

    En este artículo el autor explica como aplican técnicas de Machine Learning para resolver los desafíos al crear el grafo de conocimiento, que es esencialmente un proceso de estandarización de datos sobre contenido generado por el usuario y fuentes de datos externas, en el que el aprendizaje automático se aplica:

    • la construcción taxonómica de entidades
    • la inferencia de relaciones entre entidades,
    • la representación de datos para consumidores de datos descendentes
    • la penetración de conocimiento (información) a partir del grafo 
    • la adquisición activa de datos de los usuarios para validar nuestra inferencia y recopilar datos de capacitación.

    El grafo de conocimiento de LinkedIn es un grafo dinámico. Las nuevas entidades se agregan al grafo y las nuevas relaciones se forman continuamente. Las relaciones existentes también pueden cambiar. Por ejemplo, el mapeo de un miembro a su título actual cambia cuando tiene un nuevo trabajo. Por tanto, hay que actualizar el grafo de conocimiento de LinkedIn en tiempo real cuando se produzcan cambios en el perfil de los miembros y nuevas entidades emergentes.

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 1.8.2018 por Equipo GNOSS

    Watson y la Inteligencia Artificial. Promesas incumplidas en el sector sanitario

    There are 50 hospitals on 5 continents that use Watson for Oncology, an IBM product that charges doctors to ingest their cancer patients' records and then make treatment recommendations and suggest journal articles for further reading.

    The doctors who use the service assume that it's a data-driven AI that's using data from participating hospitals to create massive data-sets of cancer treatments and outcomes and refine its inferences. That's how IBM advertises it. But that's not how it works.

    ...

    Etiquetas:

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 28.9.2014 por Equipo GNOSS

    Proyecto BabyX. Laboratory for Animate Technologies. Auckland Bioengineering Institute. The University of Auckland. New Zealand.

    El proyecto BabyX es uno de los proyectos de inteligencia artificial que ha despertado más interés en los últimos tiempos. Se trata de una iniciativa de investigación del Laboratory for Animate Technologies, del Auckland Bioengineering Institute (University of Auckland, New Zealand).

    BabyX es un prototipo animado virtual de un bebé. Se trata de una simulación psicobiológica generada por ordenador, y es un vehículo para experimentar modelos de computación de sistemas neuronales básicos, implicados en el comportamiento interactivo y el aprendizaje.

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 26.7.2011 por Equipo GNOSS

    Entrevista con Chris Welty, uno de los creadores del supercomputador Watson. El País.

    Una de las noticias tecnológicas del año 2011 ha sido, sin duda, la victoria del superordenador Watson, de IBM, en el desafío Jeopardy. En esta entrevista, publicada el 24 de Julio en El País, Chris Welty, experto en Inteligencia Artificial y Procesamiento del Lenguaje Natural (NLP), responde a preguntas relativas al proyecto Watson y al futuro y presente de la inteligencia artificial.

    Entre lo más interesante, las siguientes frases:

    " (Watson) Se creó para manejar información. Cuando lo preparamos para Jeopardy! recopilamos información que pensamos que era útil para ese programa, pero si se cambia el contenido, se obtienen respuestas a temas diferentes. Ahora estamos construyendo un sistema para diagnóstico médico, para crear una especie de enciclopedia médica."

    "Puedes tener las respuestas, pero siempre tendrás que preguntar y hacer las preguntas correctas. Watson no sabe nada a no ser que una persona introduzca la información, una enciclopedia, por ejemplo; así que alguien tiene que escribirla..."

    "Para sistemas como Watson, que no toman decisiones, la responsabilidad ética queda en las personas. Sí creo que pronto veremos ordenadores tomando decisiones, entonces necesitarán algunas normas, pero soy muy optimista,..."

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Publicado el 11.3.2011 por Equipo GNOSS

    Básicos de Internet: "A Wager on the Turing Test: The Rules".

    En este artículo, del año 2002, Ray Kurzweil y Mitch Kapor explican un conjunto de reglas para el Test de Turing, que se usarán para determinar el ganador en la antigua apuesta entre ambos. La apuesta es la siguiente:

    "¿Se conseguirá la inteligencia artificial en 2029?" Ray Kurzweil apuesta por el sí.

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Compartido el 18.4.2010 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Estamos entrando en una nueva era tecnológica: la web 3.0 es un nuevo tipo de web, una web inteligente que trabajará como nuestro asistente personal y a la que podremos preguntar o interrogar sobre las cosas que queramos saber o le pediremos que rastree sistemáticamente aquello sobre lo que estamos interesados. La próxima década de la red, la tercera, será la de la inteligencia y la interpretación.

    "We are entering a new age of technology, where Web 3.0 Design will become a New Generation of Web Design (...)Experts believe that the new Web 3.0 web sites will act like a personal assistant"

     

    ...

    Página Web

    /

    Compartido el 29.10.2009 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Blog colaborativo en el que pueden encontrarse algunas entradas de interés sobre el desarrollo de la web semántica, pero especialmente una buena colección de papers y documentos sobre la misma. El blog está editado por las personas que a continuación se mencionan:

    Este equipo de personas trabaja en la construcción de los componentes ontológicos de la Web Semántica; está especializado en razonadores ontológicos que funcionan sobre OWL y en herramientas similares.

    Los aplicaciones con las que trabajan son:

    Pellet: un razonador en código abierto para ontologías OWL DL construido sobre Java

    JSpace: un buscador para complejos, interrelacionados datasets y fuentes de información. JSpace es la base dePOPS, un servicio experto de localización de la NASA creado para la fuerza de trabajo de la NASA.

    OwlSight: un buscador localizado en la web para la exploración de ontologías descritas en OWL.

    Pronto : un razonador probabilítico que funciona sobre ontologías OWL DL para Pellet; permite modelar de una manera directa y expresiva información caracterizada por su incertidumbre y  naturaleza probabilística con el fin de integrarla con Pellet.

    ...