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    Página Web

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    Compartido el 5.11.2010 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    YouTube - We Think

    tipo de documento Página Web

    A new book by Charles Leadbeater, 'We Think' explores the potential of the latest developments of the internet.

    Los procesos de creación colectiva, de innovación masiva necesitan que se desarrolle una vida digital rica basada en comunidades enlazadas. Nuevos valores, nuevas aspiraciones, nuevos modos de relación...Una nueva sociedad más amplia, menos compartimentada, más transparente. También con nuevos problemas y...con cosas que debemos repensar, como la identidad, la privacidad o la seguridad.

    Brillante! Inspirador.

     

     

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    Página Web

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    Compartido el 22.12.2009 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    wiki.dbpedia.org

    tipo de documento Página Web

    DBpedia es un esfuerzo comunitario para extraer información estructurada a partir de Wikipedia y hacer que dicha información esté disponible en la web. DBppedia permite hacer preguntas sofisticadas a Wikipedia así como conectar otros conjuntos de datos en la web con los datos de Wikipedia. Con ello, DBpedia espera facilitar que la gran cantidad de información de Wikipedia pueda usarse de nuevos modos interesantes y que pueda inspirar nuevos mecanismos para navegar, conectar y mejorar la propia enciclopedia, contribuyendo, en definitiva, a crear la 'next web'. Se trata de una caso de Open Linked Data Web o de Web Semántica en la práctica. Sin duda, muestra cómo será el futuro de internet

    DBpedia is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link other data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope this will make it easier for the amazing amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in new and interesting ways, and that it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking and improving the encyclopaedia itself (...)

    The DBpedia knowledge base currently describes more than 2.9 million things, including at least 282,000 persons, 339,000 places (including 241,000 populated places), 88,000 music albums, 44,000 films, 15,000 video games, 119,000 organizations (including 20,000 companies and 29,000 educational institutions), 130,000 species and 4400 diseases. The DBpedia knowledge base features labels and abstracts for these things in 91 different languages; 807,000 links to images and 3,840,000 links to external web pages; 4,878,100 external links into other RDF datasets, 415,000 Wikipedia categories, and 75,000 YAGO categories. The knowledge base consists of 479 million pieces of information (RDF triples) out of which 190 million were extracted from the English edition of Wikipedia and 289 million were extracted from other language editions (...) 

    Within the W3C Linking Open Data (LOD) community effort, an increasing number of data providers have started to publish and interlink data on the Web according to Tim Berners-Lee’s Linked Data principles. The resulting Web of Data currently consists of several billion RDF triples and covers domains such as geographic information, people, companies, online communities, films, music, books and scientific publications. In addition to publishing and interlinking datasets, there is also ongoing work on Linked Data browsers, Linked Data crawlers, Web of Data search engines and other applications that consume Linked Data from the Web. 

    The DBpedia knowledge base is served as Linked Data on the Web. As DBpedia defines Linked Data URIs for millions of concepts, various data providers have started to set RDF links from their data sets to DBpedia, making DBpedia one of the central interlinking-hubs of the ermerging Web of Data. 

    This Wiki provides information about the DBpedia community project:

    • Datasets gives an overview about the DBpedia knowledge base.
    • Ontology gives an overview about the DBpedia ontology.
    • Online Access describes how the data set can be accessed via a SPARQL endpoint and as Linked Data.
    • Downloads provides the DBpedia data sets for download.
    • Interlinking describes how the DBpedia data set is interlinked with various other datasets on the Web.
    • Use Cases lists different use cases for the DBpedia data set.
    • Extraction Framework describes the DBpedia information extraction framework.
    • Data Provision Architecture paints a picture of the software and protocols used to serve DBpedia on the Web.
    • Community explains how the DBpedia community collaborates and how people can contribute to the DBpedia effort.
    • Credits lists the people and institutions that have contributed to DBpedia so far.
    • Next steps describes ideas and future plans for the DBpedia project.

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    Página Web

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    Publicado el 19.12.2009 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Vida online: la Web en 2020 es un trabajo del Social Issues Research Centre redactado por Zoe Khor y el Dr Peter Marsh en diciembre de 2006, que, en lo sustantivo, mantiene su actualidad. Son éstas las principales referencias del estudio tal y como ellos las presentan:
    "The Web in 2020 will see:
    Technology convergence, heralding a single personal email/phone number for life and ‘always on’ connectivity coverage which – technically at least – has 100% global coverage…
    Software as a service will be the norm. This will involve outsourcing and streamlining everything from video conferencing to supply chain management…
    Mobile Web and Internet interfaces will increasingly no longer take the form of high end luxury gadgets, but will instead become utilities. We will still think of them as tools, but by 2020 they will increasingly have become ‘transparent’. Like pen and paper they will be norms, which when in use, become extensions of our bodies…
    • Technologies and applications which ‘make it’ will have stood the Technological Darwinism test. That is, they will enhance an already existing basic human need, such as the need to communicate, exchange goods and services, and shape our own identities, etc…
    • The emergence of the Web and other Internet applications as a ‘glocal’ agora. A market place, meeting place and forum for gossip, debate, politics, entertainment and more, potentially creating…
    • … a more socially aware generation – instead of seeing a rise in ‘web based personality disorders’, the space which online communities and social networking sites provide for ‘face work’ will see a generation of highly socialised and culturally sensitive individuals…
    Work spaces and work time will be more fluid (for some)…
    The Internet will be green – relying on technologies that require reduced energy, alternative energy sources and offsetting of contributions to carbon emissions
    • The Web, online communities and social networking sites will have facilitated the development of an alternative economy. Supplementing a cash economy with a ‘relative economy’ this will see goods, services and time ‘traded’ by individuals, groups and perhaps even businesses both locally and across the world…
    • The distribution of mainstream mass media – TV, film, music – will have changed significantly. Already Channel 42 have announced plans to sell domestic programmes over the internet. On demand pay-per-view packages, as well as ‘bottom up’ cultural production as facilitated by YouTube, will see media consumption further personalised and diversified…
    • After some early teething problems, voting will be carried out online and via mobile technologies, this will have increased turn out figures, and resulted in more referendums being called…
    • ... However, several Digital Divides will persist. One will be a self-selecting ‘lifestyle’ demographic of largely middle class individuals living in the post-industrial West who will ‘drop out’ of the ICT revolution in a ‘Luddite’ by choice movement… the other, more disconcertingly, will be large numbers of people in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of Asia and South America who simply do not have the means to ‘connect’ to the Internet…"

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    Página Web

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    Compartido el 8.6.2009 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    O'Reilly Radar

    tipo de documento Página Web

    At O'Reilly, a big part of our business is paying attention to what's new and interesting in the world of technology. We have a pretty good record at having anticipated some of the big technology developments in recent history. For instance, we launched the first commercial Web site, GNN, in 1993; we organized the meeting at which the term "open source" was first adopted; we were early investors in Blogger, which helped launch the blogging revolution; and more recently, our Web 2.0 conference launched a world-wide meme. We call this predictive sense the "O'Reilly Radar." And while we're certainly not always right, we are, at least, good at making interesting guesses.

    Our methodology is simple: we draw from the wisdom of the alpha geeks in our midst, paying attention to what's interesting to them, amplifying these weak signals, and seeing where they fit into the innovation ecology. Add to that the original research conducted by our Research team, and you start to get a good picture of what the technology world is thinking about. What books are people just now starting to buy, and which are falling off in interest? Which tech-related Google AdWords are rising or falling in price? What can we learn from predictive markets tracking tech trends? What do help-wanted ads tell us about technology adoption?

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    Página Web

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    Compartido el 23.5.2009 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Meetup es el sitio de un movimiento: el de aquellas personas que en las ciudades donde viven se juntan en grupo para compartir intereses concretos. Uno de esos intereses es el que se refiere al internet del futuro y a las tecnologías de la web. Hay más de 12.000 personas organizadas en grupos físicos alrededor del mundo que se juntan para compartir experiencias y pensar sobre este tema. Meetup permite localizarlos, unirse a ellos y, en definitiva, colaborar presencialmente con personas próximas sobtre este tema. Meetup favorece online la conexión offline de personas a través de grupos cementados en intereses.

    NextWeb is a New York City-based event that meet and discuss the latest Internet technology(ies), including Web 2.0, Social Networking, and Social Media as well as all aspects of business (Advertising, Marketing, and Media). Our events are held at various venues around New York City as well as in other cities across the United States. The events include presentations and/or showcases from Internet companies of all aspects, as well as time for informal networking among the attendees. This group provides an excellent format that allows business connections to be made, people to learn from one another, as as well as the ability to network into other fields/industries.Click the following link to learn about our past events and who we have worked with: http://www.meetup.com/nextweb/pages/The_NextWeb_|_Prese....

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